Assistive technology in a reformed social care system

We wrote in 2019 about the role of assistive technology in how it could help social care users.  A new Commission by two care bodies has now been launched to explore the role of assistive technology in a reformed social care system.  The COVID-19 pandemic has shown the weaknesses and frailties of the UK social care system.  What role could assistive technology play in creating a more robust social care system for the future?

Continue reading “Assistive technology in a reformed social care system”

High Court gives permission for judicial review into care home policies taken at start of pandemic

We wrote at the end of October about the crowdfunded legal challenge being brought against the UK Government in relation to their response to care homes at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Yesterday, in a remote hearing, Mr Justice Linden gave permission for this legal challenge to proceed to a full hearing.

The claimants, Dr Cathy Gardener and Fay Harris, are seeking a judicial review of the policies and related measures which had a bearing upon the protection of care homes between March and June 2020. They first formally brought their legal challenge in June, following the death of their fathers (who were both residents in care homes) from COVID-19 in April and May this year. As we have often reported in this blog, tens of thousands of care home residents have tragically died in care homes from (either confirmed or probable) COVID-19, since the beginning of the pandemic.

Continue reading “High Court gives permission for judicial review into care home policies taken at start of pandemic”

Workforce burnout and resilience in the NHS and social care – Health and Social Care Committee Oral Evidence

The Health and Social Care Committee, chaired by Jeremy Hunt MP, has launched a new inquiry to examine workforce ‘burnout’ across the NHS and social care. The focus of the committee is on workforce planning, including the effectiveness of the NHS People Plan. The level of training needed to meet the demands of the Health and Social Care Sector is also being examined.

With the media’s focus throughout the pandemic being fixed upon the rising number of COVID-19 cases and the mortality rate,  it is easy to forget the impact being felt by frontline workers. The Committee has now heard from a number of key witnesses whose evidence has shone a light on the struggles being faced.

Continue reading “Workforce burnout and resilience in the NHS and social care – Health and Social Care Committee Oral Evidence”

Visits to care homes during lockdown

The topic of visiting care home residents continues to hit the headlines this week. 

The government published guidance for visiting care home residents this week. Previously care home visits had been banned in Tier 2 and 3 areas.  The new guidance confirms that visits may continue during the lockdown period for England, so long as this is done in a COVID secure manner, using for example PPE and social distancing, and recording visits for Test & Trace. The new guidance comes following widespread pressure from charities and industry bodies to allow visits.

Continue reading “Visits to care homes during lockdown”

No testing for CQC inspectors: does it risk a breach of the requirement to provide safe care?

The Department of Health and Social Care has made the decision to deny testing to Care Quality Commission (CQC) inspectors, placing service providers at risk of breaching their requirement to provide a safe care environment.

Continue reading “No testing for CQC inspectors: does it risk a breach of the requirement to provide safe care?”

New COVID-19 measures announced for care homes in England

The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) has this week written to English local authorities outlining plans to set up specific homes or units for people being discharged from hospital who are COVID-19 positive or are awaiting a test result.  The DHSC has asked local authorities to identify suitable settings by the end of this week, with a view to having these facilities fully operational by the end of November. 

This plan was hinted at in the Adult Social Care Plan that was published in September 2020, and follows existing requirements for all persons being discharged from hospital to a care home to have a COVID-19 test before discharge, and isolate for 14 days in any case upon admission or re-admission to a care home. 

Continue reading “New COVID-19 measures announced for care homes in England”

Joint statement by CQC & MHS published

In the face of recent criticism of its response to COVID-19, the CQC has issued a joint statement with the Deputy Chief Inspector for Mental Health Services (MHS) setting out their ongoing approach to the pandemic.

The full statement can be read here.

From 6 October, the CQC and MHS will commence a roll out of a new ‘transitional regulatory approach’ (TRA). The first areas to experience this will be adult social care and dental services.

Continue reading “Joint statement by CQC & MHS published”

Lack of PPE may have contributed towards COVID-19 death of a home care client

There has been significant focus in the media in the last few months on the effect of COVID-19 on the care sector and in particular the lack of PPE available, especially at the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic.   

A recent report by the Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch (HSIB) has highlighted confusing governmental guidance on whether home care carers should wear PPE or not.  The HSIB investigates patient safety in NHS funded care.  The HSIB report notes that the primary guidance produced by Public Health England on 6 April 2020 did not mention the need to wear PPE when caring for an “extremely clinically vulnerable” client.  Further guidance produced after the report did mention the need to wear PPE but the primary domiciliary care guidance was not updated until 13 May 2020 to confirm that PPE should be worn when visiting extremely clinically vulnerable clients.   

Continue reading “Lack of PPE may have contributed towards COVID-19 death of a home care client”

COVID-19 – Clinical negligence protocol

A new protocol for the handling of clinical negligence claims during the COVID-19 crisis was agreed on 14 August 2020 between NHS Resolution (NHSR), the Society of Clinical Injury Lawyers (SCIL) and Action Against Medical Accidents (AvMA).  The Protocol has been modelled on a best practice approach to litigation agreed between APIL and FOIL.

Continue reading “COVID-19 – Clinical negligence protocol”