Mandatory vaccinations and medical exemptions of care home workers – government u-turn or a temporary reprieve?

It has recently been reported that care home workers are able to opt-out of the mandatory COVID-19 vaccination requirement by self-certifying that they are medically exempt.

Thursday 16 September 2021 was meant to be the deadline for all carers to have received their first COVID-19 vaccination. This mandatory vaccine requirement for all care home staff has been a source of constant debate since it was announced, with growing concerns that a significant number of care homes may be forced to close and thousands of staff from an already depleted workforce risked losing their jobs if they declined to have the vaccine. The government has been lobbied by both providers and unions that care home workers had been “singled out” and the very real possibility of the doomsday scenario of a mass exodus of care home staff in England, so it perhaps does not come as a great surprise that Whitehall has taken some evasive action (perhaps with an indication as to how many staff had refused the vaccine). However, how effective will this self-certification opt out process be and is it only a temporary fix to what has become a polarising political issue.

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Updated Guidance on the Statutory Duty of Candour: Greater Clarity for Registered Providers

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) have published updated guidance on meeting the duty of candour.

The updated guidance, which can be viewed here, applies to all health and social care providers registered with the CQC.

The update provides a more detailed explanation of what a notifiable safety incident is and now makes clear that the apology which is required as part of fulfilling the duty does not equate to an admission of liability. As such, an apology will not affect a provider’s indemnity cover.

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No testing for CQC inspectors: does it risk a breach of the requirement to provide safe care?

The Department of Health and Social Care has made the decision to deny testing to Care Quality Commission (CQC) inspectors, placing service providers at risk of breaching their requirement to provide a safe care environment.

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Protecting the vulnerable in the midst of COVID-19

Our recent blogs have consistently focused on this developing saga as COVID-19 continues and as we as a nation compare ourselves to our counterparts, we are increasingly coming up short.  There is a stark message coming through that our most vulnerable have been forgotten: the elderly in care homes, the detained in mental health units and those with learning disabilities.

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CQC & ADASS emergency framework

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) established the Emergency Support Framework (ESF) to ensure the CQC could continue to practice its regulatory function in maintaining safety across health and social care settings. Although all routine inspections are currently on hold, the CQC aims to use the ESF for the purpose of collating information and intelligence from a number of sources to assist the CQC with issues such as monitoring risk, identifying where support is required and delivering safe care.

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“CQC Insights” offers insight into key issues affecting adult social care providers

On 20 May 2020, the CQC published its first COVID-19 Insight document, said to be the first of its regular discussion documents on key issues affecting health and care.

The full document can be found here.

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Have things changed since Winterbourne View?

What the BBC and the CQC tell us about abuse of vulnerable patients

An undercover investigation by BBC Panorama (‘Undercover Hospital Abuse Scandal’ – 22 May 2019) revealed abuse of vulnerable patients at Whorlton Hall, an independent hospital for adults with learning disabilities and complex needs/autism.  Whorlton Hall was was previously part of the Castlebeck Group (which also ran Winterbourne View) and the Danshell Group.  In 2017 it received aGood’ rating from its regulator, the Care Quality Commission (CQC), despite previous complaints.

Continue reading “Have things changed since Winterbourne View?”